Who Is Zhou Yongkang

25/05/2012 23:03:00
Lark
Zhou Yongkang’s nefarious deeds in China have spread all the way into the international media. He is chiefly responsible for the persecution of Falun Dafa and its practitioners, but obtained his current high-level position with the aid of Jiang Zemin. Jiang, who was the initiator of the persecution when he was president and head of the CCP, made copious use of many “underlings”, selectively placing cadres who were willing to “assure the swift eradication Falung Gong…”

Zhou is now under investigation in China from highly placed Politburo members. Since the fall of Bo Xilai, Zhou has not had a minute’s peace. It remains to be seen whether the Chinese hardliners will give him a slap on the wrist, for appearance sake, or if someone in that exclusive “club” will finally have the courage to say: “Enough is enough. Justice will be done!” Most of these morally corrupt individuals are allegedly complicit in torture, murder, illegal imprisonment and organ harvesting from living Falun Gong practitioners.

Jiang also promoted Zhou Yongkang to head up the domestic security apparatus, the Political and Legislative Affairs Committee (PLAC), a massive system of police, courts and surveillance with a budget that has grown to exceed that of the Chinese military (according to official numbers), and is beyond the reach of the law.

Zhou was one of the most powerful people in China. His future looks grim, but he probably already has stashed away millions in foreign accounts and probably has various passports ready so that he can flee China to escape punishment.

This latest political storm howled in when Chongqing’s former top cop, Wang Lijun, fled for his life to the US Consulate in Chengdu on Feb 6. He set in motion a political storm that has not subsided. As one media stated: “The battle behind the scenes turns on what stance officials take toward the persecution. The faction with bloody hands – the officials that former CCP head Jiang Zemin promoted in order to carry out the persecution – is seeking to avoid accountability for their crimes and to continue the campaign. Other officials are refusing any longer to participate in the persecution. Events present a clear choice to the officials and citizens of China, and to people around the world – either support or oppose the persecution of Falun Gong. History books will record the choice each person makes.”

Zhou Yongkang’s background:

Zhou, born in 1942, has been made a Xinjiang representative to the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China this year, which may be an attempt by the leadership to more closely associate him with the controversial and often violent policies in the Uyghur region in recent years.

Zhou’s role in the security forces is broad knowledge, but he was also a petroleum engineer. Rumours abound that he has deep, lucrative connections to China’s state-run oil industry.  Xinjiang’s economy depends on the oil industry and Zhou, as an earlier chief of the Ministry of Land and Resources, oversaw Xinjiang’s oil system and had developed a personal support network in the region over more than a decade.

Some of the saner, conscience-driven Chinese leaders are attempting to strip him of his well-planned, money-rich personal support network and put an end to his heinous crimes.

Hu Jintao’s faction of the Chinese Communist Party’s present power struggle appears to be ousting some of the most bloodthirsty, money-grabbing autocrats.

Let us hope Hu and his faction succeed.

Watch for updates to these ongoing developments.

Compiled by Lark.

Source – http://en.kanzhongguo.com/realchina/4719.html

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