Dark Secrets Behind Flashy Merchandise – Slave Labor Products by Sichuan Province Women’s Prison (Part 3)

October 17, 2013 | By a Falun Gong practitioner from Sichuan Province

(Minghui.org) (Continued from Part 2:http://en.minghui.org/html/articles/2013/10/11/142653.html )

Yue Embroidery

All the sketches shown in the photos are Yue embroidery designs.

Are these embroidery designs not pleasant to the eyes? Certainly, silk bed covers embroidered with these designs, using colorful silk threads, are appealing. At a bargain price, who wouldn’t buy them? After all, it is quite unlikely that anyone would even dream that behind these colorful products with their intricate designs are heartbreaking stories.

Additional patterns: http://pkg2.minghui.org/mh/2013/8/26/yue-xiu.zip

Seventy individual patterns are combined and embroidered on bedcovers by Falun Gong practitioners and other inmates. Yet, they are not paid.

For certain, these embroidered products are elegant and to be admired. However, before becoming delighted by the bargain price one should ask, “Under what circumstances were these products produced?”

Embroidered products are desirable if produced by a willing workforce, but for prisoners who are persecuted for their faith, producing these products is an agonizing process full of suffering. These prisoners are forced to produce large quantities and given a untenable quota. Besides there are deadlines that are very difficult to be met.

The workers are given the bare minimum of raw materials. Any faulty embroidery is cut off and redone. Anyone who doesn’t meet the deadline and quota is subjected to physical punishment and torture. Many relatively rich inmates are paying skilled inmates to do the work and in some cases they bribe prison guards to get a free pass.

When working on embroideries, inmates have to remain in a fixed position for a long period of time with no break. This is devastating to their health. In addition, they are allowed only a short time for eating and restroom visits. Besides, any time away from work has to be approved by a prison guards.

Producing these embroidered products is heartbreaking work. Sitting there and embroidering all day long is already difficult, but the worst is the fear that they may be punished if they don’t meet quotas and deadlines.

It is hard to imagine that these people have to work despite suffering back pain. Also, many develop poor eyesight due to the dim light in the workshop, which doesn’t get better when transferred to other jobs.

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